In addition to the broad arts-infused academic curriculum we offer a variety of specialty classes taught by teachers whose focus in on a particular subject.

Spanish

In the early grades, Spanish is taught largely through imitation, storytelling, verses, songs, drama, recitation, games, puppetry, and movement. The teacher places great emphasis on pronunciation and speech. The teacher works to instill the students with joy and pride in learning the target language and culture. Comprehension rather than output is emphasized.

In Grades 4-5 writing and reading become a focal point. Beginning elements of grammar are taught. The language teacher uses dialogues, storytelling, verses, songs, tongue twisters, and small plays during instruction. Throughout these years, the students’ vocabulary comprehension increases,and they are able to say simple descriptive sentences, perform dialogues, and retell simple stories.

Music

In the early grades, class teachers are responsible for music instruction and integrate music into many class activities with singing and playing of pentatonic flutes. Children learn the concepts of pitch and rhythm in an imaginative way.In the upper grades singing  is sometimes taught as a separate class once a week, though morning lessons still include singing and recorder playing.

In the spring of 3rd grade, string instruments (violin, viola, cello) are introduced to the children so they and their parents can choose an instrument to begin the following year.

Classes in violin/viola and cello are offered twice a week in fourth through eighth. After basic instrumental skills are established, music reading is introduced and enhanced through the playing of beginning string literature. Students have many opportunities to perform in assemblies, at area retirement facilities and at special events. Every student plays a stringed instrument and many continue in high school and beyond.

Handwork

We teach handwork  in order learn practical skills and dexterity but also to further cognitive development. Handwork supports every student’s unfolding as a well-balanced individual with self-confidence.  Mathematical concepts such as parallelism, mirror imaging, progression and geometric forms are implicitly experienced through a tactile learning process. Students receive fundamental skills and understanding to experience how basic materials are made. As the projects become more complex through the grades they gain a great appreciation for the development of processes and technology.

For first and second grade, children learn to knit and purl. In third grade they learn to crochet and throughout the year will process a fleece and learn to spin on a drop spindle. In fourth grade, the children take up cross-stitch. In fifth grade, children learn how to knit with four needles and make socks. Sixth grade brings the opportunity to design and hand-sew an animal. Seventh grade progresses to hand-sewn dolls and doll clothing.  In the eighth grade, while students are studying the Industrial Age, the Handwork curriculum involves learning to sew with a sewing machine.

Games

In middle school we have a dedicated Games teacher that teaches each grade twice a week. For this age, games class uses a sense of formation – how players position and conduct themselves in a team setting. Gymnastics and fitness activities demand all-around skill, spatial awareness and courage. A seventh and eighth grade track meet provides another opportunity for the students to challenge themselves as well as meet students from other Waldorf schools.

Woodworking

In grade five, the practical art of woodworking instruction begins. The student learns to work with various hand tools, shaping and forming useful objects such as a bowl and spoon, bringing form and function to blocks of wood. Later, projects with moveable parts are introduced. Woodworking develops creativity, three dimensional thinking and the art of patience. Endurance, accuracy and confidence skills are strengthened as the student gradually brings forth a purposeful object from the wood.